YWS 30th anniversary series: Tom*

YWS 30th anniversary series: Tom*

*Name has been changed to maintain confidentiality.

At 14 years old, he was living with his alcoholic father.  In his father’s home he became a statistic, one of the 47% of homeless youth who report being physically abused by a family member.  By his fifteenth birthday, he had become a Crown Ward and entered the foster care system.  In one year he bounced between multiple foster care and group homes.  He acknowledges that he was angry (and a challenge) because in his heart he knew that he did not deserve his fate.  When he suffered abuse in a group home at sixteen, he checked himself out of care, and took to the streets.  He became one of the hidden homeless, bunking with friends, living in alleys and doorways.

A high school drop-out he drifted from job to job.  Wanting a place to call his own, he camped out in parks.  One evening after not having eaten for days, he was driven to steal food and he got into trouble with the law.  A court mandated rehabilitation period followed.  Upon his release with no other options he arrived at Youth Without Shelter (YWS).

His YWS Case Manager began to help him by simply listening.  As pieces of his story tumbled out she began to connect him with resources to restore his confidence.  Goals were set for each day.  Access to a gym was arranged so he could physically tackle the stresses in his life.  He was able to secure employment.  It was in a meeting with the Housing Workers that the possibility of finishing high school first arose.  School was not even on his list of goals.

Shortly after, he moved into the Stay in School Program and enrolled in an adult high school.  When completing a school assignment he wrote:  “Without Youth Without Shelter, I would not be typing this essay right now.  Instead I would probably be thinking of how to get my next meal of where I will sleep tonight.”  Wanting to give back (and to complete his community service hours required to graduate) he offered to paint a mural in the emergency residence family room.  Little did we know of his hidden artistic talent.  Today, a magnificent beach scene continues to welcome youth to YWS.  He is now a proud high school graduate, an achievement he never thought possible.  Congratulations.

August 2012:  YWS In Transition Newsletter

YWS 30th anniversary series: Mike

YWS 30th anniversary series: Mike

He desperately needed a place to stay, and more immediately food and a bed.  He was at a turning point in his life, having been homeless for much of his teen years, calling the street home, and in and out of shelters and jail.  A phone call brought him to Youth Without Shelter.

“You’ve given me hope.  Through the housing worker, Laura’s tremendous amount of help I have been able to secure housing.  Never having acquired housing before, the process seemed foreign and daunting.  I thought finding housing impossible after all my failed attempts.  Throughout my search at YWS I always had someone to go to with problems, someone to coach me for calls to landlords and to tell me all the right questions to ask. After living in shelters so long the concept of living on my own was kind of scary but knowing I’ll have on-going support once I’m on my own gives me the confidence I need to be successful.

For years I’ve been just credits away from completing high school, yet without the knowledge of how to get myself registered.  It has always seemed so far away.  Now with the help of my case worker, Emme I’ve obtained my high school credit transcript and will be beginning school at an adult learning centre.  Now I believe I may have a shot at the normal life, I’ve been dreaming of since my life started going downhill.

The programs at YWS are so helpful in building a productive life.  Daily we have workshops covering a huge range of subjects from housing and employment to hygiene and laundry.  Everything one needs to function taught in creative and fun ways to learn.  Another program taught is substance abuse which is amazingly helpful to those with abuse problems and has hook-ups with more in-depth counseling. Now the best program I’ve seen by far is being brought out for a night to Cirque du Soleil.  That had to be one of the funnest times of my life.  I thank you from the bottom of my heart for all you have done for me.  And to all of you who contribute to Youth Without Shelter in any way I have no way to express my gratitude to you other than to say you do more than build lives you save them.” (Mike)

Where is Mike now?  In late September Mike moved out to his own place not far from the shelter.  He regularly checks in and shares his cooking adventures with the YWS Team.  Mike is working closely with the YWS Employment Facilitator to secure part-time employment.  He is back in the classroom finishing up high school.  Mike now has his sight set on getting to college to complete a Pre-Welding Certificate Apprenticeship Program.

November 2012

YWS 30th anniversary series: Jay

YWS 30th anniversary series: Jay

Walk through Jay’s elementary school and you will see his name front and center on the honour student recognition wall. Graduating into high school Jay felt tremendous pressure to continue to excel at school.  To relieve that pressure Jay began to self-harm by cutting himself. He hid the cuts on his arms and legs by wearing long sleeves and pants no matter the weather. Jay felt his family could not understand the pressure he was under. Conflict at home escalated. One day in Grade 11 Jay packed up his clothes, left home and sought shelter at Youth Without Shelter (YWS).

When Jay met his YWS Case Manager she encouraged him to talk.  She did not judge or criticize, she listened.  Jay recalls he felt for the first time his feelings were being “respected”. He continued to attend school everyday although he found it increasingly hard to concentrate and his grades were plummeting.  As the trust developed between Jay and the Case Manager she asked him to meet with one of the shelter’s partners, an agency that specializes in youth mental health. In time Jay was diagnosed with bi-polar disorder.

Jay’s journey has not been an easy one. He has had periods of family reconciliation, hospitalization, new health challenges and adjusting to medication. Jay has been living in his own place now for more than two years.  Through it all he has maintained ties to YWS, calling the shelter his “safe haven.”

Jay’s story is an example of how your support is changing lives every day here at YWS. Thanks to you, Jay has a “safe haven” to turn to as he moves forward. Jay credits YWS with teaching him how to budget, so he can maintain independent living.  He attends Supper Club at YWS to enjoy a hot meal, have a chat and access the on-site food bank.  Jay has enrolled in a college photography program. He aspires to open a business designing custom skateboards.  On a recent visit to YWS Jay shared: “I have two numbers on speed dial on my phone: 911 and you, YWS. Youth Without Shelter is #1: 416.748.0110.”