How The Home Depot Canada Foundation is helping put an end to youth homelessness with “Paper Doors”

How The Home Depot Canada Foundation is helping put an end to youth homelessness with “Paper Doors”

The Home Depot Canada Foundation is committed to ending youth homelessness, pledging to invest $20 million over five years through The Orange Door Project. This initiative will give homeless youth the housing, support and hope they need to live safe, healthy and productive lives.
One component of The Orange Door Project is The Home Depot’s national fundraising campaign.  From now until July 2, The Home Depot customers can buy a $2 paper door in support of a local youth-focused housing charity.

All funds raised at The Home Depot Rexdale store during the campaign will support Youth Without Shelter. Encourage your friends, family members, neighbours and colleagues to support the campaign today!

Learn more at orangedoorproject.ca

YWS 30th anniversary series: “Listen”

YWS 30th anniversary series: “Listen”

Many of our youth share their stories through various artistic mediums. Below, a poem written and narrated by our youth called “Listen”.

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The Home Depot Canada Foundation announce 2017 partnership

The Home Depot Canada Foundation announce 2017 partnership

Today, The Home Depot Canada Foundation announced a 2017 partnership with Youth Without Shelter (YWS) with an investment of $125,000. The Home Depot Canada Foundation focuses on supporting initiatives that prevent and end youth homelessness through renovation and repair projects and programs that provide youth access to safe, stable shelter and support services.  This gift of $125,000 provides essential project and program funding to Youth Without Shelter.  Funds have enabled the replacement of the shelter’s kitchen walk-in combination freezer and refrigerator.  The YWS kitchen is the “heart of our home”, a 24 hour operation offering three meals and two snacks daily and facilitating life skills learning.  The program funding supports the continued enhancement and growth of YWS’s Employment Program. Priority areas identified by youth in the employment program include the need for increased support with pre-employment trainings, workshops and certifications.

Team Depot is on-site today sharing their energy and skills to bring YWS’s outdoor space to life with fresh, colorful plantings and herbs for container gardening.  Lunchtime will bring the YWS youth and staff team and Team Depot together to enjoy a meal prepared by Team Depot!

Thank you to The Home Depot Canada Foundation for your continued investment in young people challenged with homelessness.  This gift recognizes that each youth comes to YWS with their own set of strengths, challenges and dreams, each requiring personalized strategies to successfully and safely transition to independent living.

YWS 30th anniversary series: Liceie

YWS 30th anniversary series: Liceie

It is hard to imagine the struggles, fears and loneliness one might feel being in a strange country and having no one. As hard as it may be to imagine, it is a situation that occurred to a young seventeen year old girl named Liceie. She came to Canada for the summer as a visitor, never suspecting that she would be held against her will by a relative who would become abusive and steal her only means of returning home.

Liceie was brought to Youth Without Shelter (YWS) after she phoned the police from a neighbour’s house where she had run to escape physical abuse by her aunt. When she arrived at the shelter she was afraid and had no idea what was to happen to her next. She had never been in a shelter, let alone one in a foreign country. The police informed her that they would try to retrieve her stolen passport and plane ticket which were believed to be held by her aunt.

The workers at YWS quickly began working with Liceie to calm her fears and make her feel more at home. The housing worker immediately met with her to see what could be done to assist her in returning to her home country of St. Vincent. In attempting to acquire travel documents for her the Consulate of St. Vincent informed the housing worker that, given the situation, they would issue her new documents for her travel home if her original ones were not retrieved.

Liceie was escorted by YWS to a meeting with Project Go Home to see if they would be able to fund Liceie’s trip back to St. Vincent. They were indeed able to help her and now, because of the meaningful connections made by YWS, Liceie had YWS, Project Go Home, the O.P.P. and the Consulate of St. Vincent all working to resolve her dilemma.

Meanwhile, Liceie was attending the Life Skills Program sessions at YWS, making new friends and getting used to the routine at the shelter. YWS provided her with warm clothing as all she had with her was a small summer wardrobe. She made calls to her mother in St. Vincent to let her know that she was safe and keep her up to date on the help she was receiving to go home. The YWS housing worker was able to help her through every step of the process by spending hours on the phone with the O.P.P., Project Go Home and the Consulate of St. Vincent, and attending all the appointments with her.

That November, two weeks to the day Liceie was brought to YWS by the police, she was on a flight back home to her mother. Liceie was grateful for everything that had been done for her and although she had nothing to give, she showed her gratitude by making bead bracelets in our Life Skills Program for the strangers she had found safety and security with.

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YWS 30th anniversary series: Nancy

YWS 30th anniversary series: Nancy

Stories are often shared over meals at Youth Without Shelter (YWS). Nancy called YWS to arrange a date for a team of volunteers from her church to provide and serve a “home cooked” meal to YWS’s 50 youth. While visiting the shelter Nancy was asked how she learned about YWS. Well, YWS had been her “home” several years ago. For many years, Nancy never shared that she had any contact with a shelter, let alone had lived in one. But now she has begun to open up, firmly believing that her experience can help others.

Family circumstances were such that Nancy had no choice but to strike out on her own as a teen. For a time she tried balancing living on her own with staying in school. Nancy dreamed of becoming a nurse and was enrolled in a college nursing program. But she simply could not afford rent, and lost her housing. It was a social worker who told Nancy about a newly opened program called the Stay in School Program (SIS) at Youth Without Shelter.

Looking back, Nancy says that coming to YWS was like being welcomed into a “home”. The youth and staff team became her family. “The computer lab, the school supplies, space to study, all of those vital supports helped me stay in school.” Nancy finished the nursing program and graduated with honours. “If I had not come to YWS I would not be a graduate. I would have dropped out.”

Today, Nancy works full-time as a public health nurse specializing in healthy food and nutrition education with youth ages 5 through 18. She is settled with a family of her own. Nancy’s church community is a big part of her life – and it is there that Nancy shares her life journey with young women.

“I am the impact of donations to the shelter. What I have achieved would not have been possible without all those who support YWS. If I a former resident of YWS can come back and give, than any one can give. It does not have to be a big donation, many small donations can make a difference.”

You can hear Nancy share her story here.

YWS welcomes new Executive Director Steve Doherty

YWS welcomes new Executive Director Steve Doherty

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The Board of Directors of Youth Without Shelter (YWS) is pleased to announce the appointment of Steve Doherty as the shelter’s new Executive Director, commencing May 8, 2017.

The majority of Steve’s career has been devoted to children’s mental health, both working in and managing treatment homes and day programs.  In a way, we are welcoming him back to the neighbourhood. He launched his career 24 years ago as a Child and Youth Care Worker at the George Hull Centre –  in a residential building that YWS later purchased, and renovated to launch our innovative Stay in School Program!

Steve has counselled youth with addictions using a harm-reduction approach to treatment, and believes strongly in a strength-based model of care.  His progressive leadership and senior management experience, approach and passion for his work make him a perfect fit for YWS:

“The youth I have worked with over the years have been great teachers, and the lessons have stuck with me. The resilience and spirit they demonstrate are a constant source of awe. I cannot wait to learn from the highly respected YWS team, and be part of something truly amazing.”

Please join us in welcoming Steve to YWS. The Board is committed to working alongside him as we continue developing youth-centered solutions to ending homelessness, one youth at a time, one step at a time.

YWS 30th anniversary series: George

YWS 30th anniversary series: George

Growing up George’s family life was in constant turmoil. Early on George spent time in foster care when his Dad could not control his temper. At 16, George made the decision to leave home when his father insisted he drop out of school and make money, an education was not needed. George was determined to get an education. He turned to “couch surfing” moving from one friends home to the next. When that was no longer an option he found his way to a shelter. Throughout it all George remained in school. It was a shelter housing worker who recommended George apply to Youth Without Shelter’s Stay in School Program. He applied and moved in.

George finished Grade 12 and attended an adult high school to take additional courses and improve his marks. George’s favorite subject is Chemistry, where he achieved a grade of 95%. What’s next for George? College- George’s goal is to be a paramedic. George: “I’ve found the resources I need to be able to focus on finishing school. I can concentrate on my studies; there are computers, quite spaces. Bus fare had become a big obstacle in getting to school. I really value the TTC pass provided in the Stay in School Program.”

Note: George has now transitioned to independent living, joined the Canadian Armed Forces and is pursuing his dream of becoming a paramedic.