Us and Them

Us and Them

Although many of us would like to believe otherwise, how we think of someone else impacts how we not only respond to them but also how we judge someone after the fact, and apply a narrative for the future.  When we misjudge or prejudge other people, the risk is that we soon put those persons into the ‘Them’ category, while the people who judges put themselves into the ‘Us’ category.  Thus we enter into the danger of Us and Them.

Us and Them is dangerous as it encourages blanket statements which are usually quite negative to the Them and positive to the Us.  There is a dehumanizing aspect to Them.  This makes people feel better since they aren’t burdened by empathy, which could likely implore someone to act.  Not acting can evoke guilty feelings that are uncomfortable.  Instead, too often we strive for comfort and this can lead to being dismissive to the plight of others.  The other strategy often employed is to attach a value statement to the Them.  To see Them as being the author of their own misfortune allows us to once again distance ourselves from empathy.  We group the Them into convenient packages – and socially constructed spaces.

My challenge to everyone is to change how you view others in a way which humanizes and individualizes Them.  Putting homeless youth in the same space as Us is the most basic change that can do so much good.  In this space you are thinking of homeless youth as good people having a hard time.  The stereotypes and social construct around youth homelessness are simply untrue.  Challenge those stereotypes when you hear them.  Even more importantly, challenge yourself should they enter in your head.

S. Doherty