YWS 30th anniversary series: Sean

YWS 30th anniversary series: Sean

I was 16 years old, scared, full of anger. I never felt so alone.

Sean’s relationship with his Mom was one of conflict. A single mom, Sean resented her, blaming her for his dad not being there. Because they were not getting along Sean at 16 moved into a rooming house. It was in the rooming house that Sean was introduced to crack, and his struggle with addiction began. “I’ve done things I am not proud of, sold my parents wedding rings, all for a fix.”

After a stint in rehab, Sean found his way to Youth Without Shelter (YWS): “I was 16 years old, scared and full of anger. I never felt so alone.” “It was scary on the streets alone, acting tough but I was alone.” The year was 1996.

That day was the beginning of the rest of my life. YWS took me in with open arms.” Sean struggled with the structure and rules of YWS and his addiction. Over an eight year period Sean was in and out of YWS multiple times. But the YWS Team never gave up on Sean. “They cared, they wanted to help. It was like you have all these parents pushing you to do good.” Sean committed himself to YWS’s programs participating in day programs (today’s Steps to Success Program): “I learned so much about myself during life skills. I eventually took over the kitchen on the weekends, making the most amazing brunches.”

Today Sean is an event planner. Recently Sean shared with the YWS Team that he has been accepted to the Child and Youth Care Worker Program at Humber College as a mature student. He would like to give back drawing upon his life experiences, and maybe do his student placement at YWS.

You can hear Sean share his story in the new 2016 A home for the holidays video

“Many things have changed since my last stay in 2004 but the one thing that never changes is the YWS vision: Ending homelessness, one youth at a time, one step at a time.”

YWS 30th anniversary series: Melony

YWS 30th anniversary series: Melony

Melony was born in Trinidad and Tobago. She lived with her Mom, brothers and Step-Dad. As a youth she was persecuted for her sexuality, she had a girlfriend. Melony tried to run away but when she did the police located her, and raped her. She made the decision for her own safety to leave Trinidad and Tobago.

Melony arrived in Canada to live with her Aunt, who she really did not know. Her living situation quickly turned difficult as her Mom had shared with her Aunt that back home a girlfriend had been part of her life. The Aunt who had a daughter of her own seemed to feel that Melony would influence her daughter. Living together became intolerable.

Melony found her way to Youth Without Shelter(YWS). “They became my best friends, helped me with anything I needed.” “If you want to be independent YWS helps you be independent. No one does it for you. They will guide you, but you must do the work to be independent.”

Melony has now transitioned to her own place and received training in the administrative field. She is writing a book about her life experiences which she hopes will support others with their life journeys. You can hear Melony share her own story in the video on the YWS home page.

Youth Without Shelter (YWS ) celebrates 30th anniversary with 30 Stories of youth empowerment

Youth Without Shelter (YWS ) celebrates 30th anniversary with 30 Stories of youth empowerment

Youth Without Shelter’s (YWS ) 30th year of empowering youth with the skills and resources to transition to independent living.

Starting today and over the next 30 weeks YWS will be sharing with you on our website blog 30 stories for 30 years, stories of youth who have called YWS their home.

“The race is not for the swift but for those who endure to the end.” It is not about how fast you can to get to the finish line in life, it is about getting there at some point in the future. What if you did not have a race? What if there seemed to be no way out? What if it felt so dark I could not see where to start?

I am proud to say, I always have had a race, a dream, a pathway to success! I do not know how that journey would have begun but at least I knew some day I would full-fill that dream.

But today I am delighted to talk about how my race began. To start off I could say it was a struggle staying at home. I had to fight to go to school everyday. Not to mention the thought of going home was unbearable. All through the day all I could think about in class was not going home. It was so hard to get reading assignments and schoolwork done. I would often go to the library to study after school but it was just for a couple of hours because I would have to make my way back home as the streets got too dark. I would also try to sleep as soon as I got home from school so that I could stay up in the nights when it was quiet. But trying to sleep was also a challenge because the environment was very noisy. I barely passed the first semester (a pre-college prep program to help me get into my practical nursing program).

In the second semester I decided I wasn’t going to fail because I needed the grades to get into my program. So I was talking to a friend about my situation and she referred me to a social worker. This social worker introduced me to the Stay in School Program, where she brought me to complete the application. I breathed a sigh of relief. Better days are coming. But you know in life you got to have patience so that took a little while due to the fact that I was on a waiting list for the Stay in School Program. I humbly waited at school. I tried to connect with students that I noticed were more focused. I eventually made friends with this girl who was really good on the materials in class. We then started to get closer, whereas after class we would stay back and review the materials. After getting to know her more she offered I could stay with her until we were done with this semester. That was like hearing “It’s dinner time for me.” She offered me a nice bed to sleep on and a quiet environment. Each day we attended school together, we kept focused, we studied our notes headed to and from school on the bus. This living situation helped me greatly so my marks started to improve.

While staying at her house for about one and a half months I got a call from YWS. I was so happy…..I moved into the Stay in School Program. I was welcomed by staff with a nice bed, clean sheets and other items that I needed. I felt comfortable and at home. This program has had a tremendous impact on my school life whereas I stayed focused and continued studying. At the end of the semester I can proudly say I got accepted into the practical nursing program. This is the program I always wanted to go into. When I was younger everyone around me would call me nurse. I tend to be caring, loving and considerate. I was offered a part-time job to look after an elderly individual. It was always a pleasure to go there to make her life happy, clean and comfortable.

I say all of this to explain that the opportunity to get into the nursing program would not have been possible if I did not have the help of Youth Without Shelter.

On behalf of all the Stay in School Program residents I would like to express our great gratitude to each and every one of you for making our races a reality.

Rayshell