YWS 30th anniversary series: Nancy

YWS 30th anniversary series: Nancy

Stories are often shared over meals at Youth Without Shelter (YWS). Nancy called YWS to arrange a date for a team of volunteers from her church to provide and serve a “home cooked” meal to YWS’s 50 youth. While visiting the shelter Nancy was asked how she learned about YWS. Well, YWS had been her “home” several years ago. For many years, Nancy never shared that she had any contact with a shelter, let alone had lived in one. But now she has begun to open up, firmly believing that her experience can help others.

Family circumstances were such that Nancy had no choice but to strike out on her own as a teen. For a time she tried balancing living on her own with staying in school. Nancy dreamed of becoming a nurse and was enrolled in a college nursing program. But she simply could not afford rent, and lost her housing. It was a social worker who told Nancy about a newly opened program called the Stay in School Program (SIS) at Youth Without Shelter.

Looking back, Nancy says that coming to YWS was like being welcomed into a “home”. The youth and staff team became her family. “The computer lab, the school supplies, space to study, all of those vital supports helped me stay in school.” Nancy finished the nursing program and graduated with honours. “If I had not come to YWS I would not be a graduate. I would have dropped out.”

Today, Nancy works full-time as a public health nurse specializing in healthy food and nutrition education with youth ages 5 through 18. She is settled with a family of her own. Nancy’s church community is a big part of her life – and it is there that Nancy shares her life journey with young women.

“I am the impact of donations to the shelter. What I have achieved would not have been possible without all those who support YWS. If I a former resident of YWS can come back and give, than any one can give. It does not have to be a big donation, many small donations can make a difference.”

You can hear Nancy share her story here.

YWS 30th anniversary series: George

YWS 30th anniversary series: George

Growing up George’s family life was in constant turmoil. Early on George spent time in foster care when his Dad could not control his temper. At 16, George made the decision to leave home when his father insisted he drop out of school and make money, an education was not needed. George was determined to get an education. He turned to “couch surfing” moving from one friends home to the next. When that was no longer an option he found his way to a shelter. Throughout it all George remained in school. It was a shelter housing worker who recommended George apply to Youth Without Shelter’s Stay in School Program. He applied and moved in.

George finished Grade 12 and attended an adult high school to take additional courses and improve his marks. George’s favorite subject is Chemistry, where he achieved a grade of 95%. What’s next for George? College- George’s goal is to be a paramedic. George: “I’ve found the resources I need to be able to focus on finishing school. I can concentrate on my studies; there are computers, quite spaces. Bus fare had become a big obstacle in getting to school. I really value the TTC pass provided in the Stay in School Program.”

Note: George has now transitioned to independent living, joined the Canadian Armed Forces and is pursuing his dream of becoming a paramedic.

YWS 30th anniversary series: Marianne

YWS 30th anniversary series: Marianne

“Homelessness happens. When I walk through the doors in my high school you can’t tell I live in a shelter. We all walk in different shoes.”

(Marianne, age 17)

Each day for a month Marianne, 17, filled her backpack with a few personal belongings and stored them in her high school locker. Marianne had decided that she was not going to take the beating of her father’s fists anymore. Beatings as far back as her toddler years haunted Marianne. One morning she said good-bye to her father. He replied “good-bye, see you tonight.” but Marianne knew this was good-bye. She was not coming home tonight.

A school guidance counsellor determined that Marianne was essentially living out of her school locker and brought Marianne to the safety of Youth Without Shelter. Marianne’s life belongings from her locker were now in the bedroom she calls “home” at Youth Without Shelter.

At Youth Without Shelter Marianne was not alone, she had someone to talk to and someone who will listen to her fears, hopes and dreams. Together with her Case Manager they discussed her specific needs, created goals and a plan of action to achieve these goals. If you visited Marianne’s bedroom at YWS you would have seen these goals boldly spelled out on a list taped to her locker:

  1. Find a job.
  2. Find an apartment.
  3. Stay in school.
  4. Stop drinking.

How did Marianne do with checking off her list? With the support of the YWS Steps to Success Program she put together her resume and called employers from our job board. She stayed in school. Marianne’s case manager connected her with a support group for abuse survivors. Marianne also met with a housing program worker to review her housing options. Through the Housing Program Marianne connected with “Project Go Home” and reunited with her extended family.

A note arrived at YWS from Marianne: “I want you all to know….you mean a lot to me and you were my real and true family while I was in Canada. You never judged me, left me in my hard times…for which I really admire you! You guys make our days better and we need you.”

Note: While staying at YWS Marianne volunteered talents, sharing her photography skills. This story image is by Marianne, taken by the Humber River near YWS.

YWS 30th anniversary series: Tracy & Nichole

YWS 30th anniversary series: Tracy & Nichole

Former residents of YWS often reconnect through email sharing their stories, here are two voices from the past.

“I would first like to introduce myself as a former resident and a success story from your program. It was June 1987 when I was dropped off at your front door because my parents didn’t want me any more. With the help of your program in as little as 2 ½ weeks I was able to find housing, part-time employment and reenrolled in school.

Today I am a Registered Social Service Worker, Community Service Worker Instructor, happily married with four children and own my own home.”

– Tracy

“I was a teenager with a lot of issues. I was on the street and getting myself into some things that I know I shouldn’t have but at the time that was how I maintained my friends. I was 17 years old, alone in a city I wasn’t familiar with and had no idea where to turn. At 18 after spending many nights in YWS and other shelters, and in some cases outstaying my welcome I turned my life around. As a youth I didn’t finish high school and found that I was young, uneducated, and living at the poverty level. At the age of 21 I entered college and once completed I went to university. I am now 33 and a seasoned social worker. I have been working with individuals with developmental disabilities for 10 years and I enjoy every moment of it. I used to say that the workers at YWS were only there for the money but I now have the same feeling of accomplishment and satisfaction that they had from helping teens and youth. Thank you all for being there, for guiding me and for letting me know that I was able to accomplish more than what I believed I could The work you guys do is incredible and you change more lives than you will every know.

– Nicole

YWS 30th anniversary series: Derek

YWS 30th anniversary series: Derek

I stayed at Youth Without Shelter when times were tough. It wasn’t just a place to stay…it was about what I could do to find my way. YWS gives you direction. There are many options, it takes time for all of us to find our way. I know it took me two years to decide to swallow my pride and go back to finish school. I now reside in BC and have worked at many jobs.

Thanks YWS for picking up the pieces when the chips were down, you were there! Thanks for making it a safe place to stay. Youth Without Shelter led me to start making changes in my life for a better future that I could look forward to. Remember, the future is not just tomorrow.

If I was there I would donate my time for this worthy cause. Thanks for all the help. Enclosed is a pic of me and my car! This is what I was able to do with a car after finding that whatever I try to do is possible. If you believe you can do something, you can! Thanks and I hope others can find what I found, only faster. The three most import things in life are: improvise, adapt and overcome. That’s how you succeed!

Derek, 2005

YWS 30th anniversary series: Misery

YWS 30th anniversary series: Misery

For as long as he can remember there was only his father and himself. There was always conflict. He is the first to admit that he didn’t want any rules. However, as he matured he saw his father behave in ways towards him that he knew were not right and that he could not respect.

He ran away from home for the first time at age ten. He ran away repeatedly in his early teens—sometimes spending the night on friend’s couches, many times just roaming the streets or keeping warm overnight in a local coffee shop. Home with his father was not where he could be. He managed to finish Grade 9 and 10. By the age of 16 he had truly left home and fallen in with, in his own words, the wrong crowd.

Not long after he sought shelter at Youth Without Shelter (YWS) for the first time. His approach with staff was argumentative. How could they be much different from his father? Staff asked him to consider what his next steps were going to be. Why not write his thoughts and dreams down in a journal, suggested a case manager. This idea stuck with him. To this day he continues to write in a journal wherever he is.

Each time he has appeared at the doors of YWS the case management team have worked step by step to connect him with the resources to enable him to make a move to independence. Each time he has moved out he hasn’t quite made it work. But then something unexpected happened that totally changed his life around—he became a father.

This time his stay at YWS is more long-term and focused. He has always “felt the staff here care—you can talk and they will listen.” From staff he is hearing: it’s time to make a change, if you want to be a father and have this child in your life. His case manager is making sure he stays on track. He has put together his resume in the Steps Program. His goal is to complete his high school education. He is working on his housing options with the housing coordinator. He is always busy helping around the shelter. The staff say he has become a positive mentor to the younger residents in the shelter.

In essence his story is what Youth Without Shelter is all about: ending homelessness, one youth at a time, one step at a time. We wanted to share with you a poem he wrote in his journal titled “Misery”.

Misery

(Author: YWS past resident)
I try to forget the pain.
But yet it remains.
Driven insane by madness.
I surround myself in total
darkness.
I am sad, unhappy and lifeless.
The girl that’s gone I truly do miss.
For she is the mother of my daughter.
And me the father that don’t exist.
My anger grows as I form a fist.
I take a swing, but did I miss.
Miss the fact that I’m still in love.
With the one that’s mention above.
I must be stupid to believe this.
To be with her is my only wish.
The girl I love, the girl I miss.
If only I can give her one kiss.
To prove how much I care.
How much I want to be near.
Close to her and in her heart.
The guy she with tears us further apart.
My heart is extremely broken.
I just want to be the one that’s chosen.

YWS 30th anniversary series: Angeline

YWS 30th anniversary series: Angeline

Sometimes I feel my mother never loved me.
Maybe she didn’t.
There’s nothing to suggest otherwise.
No early morning cuddles.
No kiss going out the door.
No warm embrace when I was at my lowest
No comforting voice to vanquish my nightmares.
But I do remember a hefty fist connecting with my tear stained cheeks and the words:
“Leave. Never come back.”
Broken and shaken
I was taken here
A place I felt was designed for the broken and shaken
Somewhere to leave us and forget us.
But maybe just maybe
We can change that and fix ourselves.
There’s plenty of evidence to suggest that just look at me.

Poem written by Angeline, March 2010.

YWS 30th Anniversary Series: Matt

YWS 30th Anniversary Series: Matt

“My name is Matthew and I was a long term resident at YWS.  I came to YWS 6 years ago, struggling with drug and alcohol problems and dealing with the recent loss of my mother.  I was on a path of self-destruction.  Upon arriving at YWS I was greeted and welcomed by a very friendly staff team that were willing to help as soon as you walk in the door.  Hungry and tired, I was offered food within minutes, and was shown to my room, where I was told I could rest, and when I was ready I could come down and start what was going to be the rest of my life.

I met with my case manager and my initial plan was to take the quickest route out, so I started looking for work and an apartment.  At this point in my life I really didn’t have any realistic goals, I was looking for the quickest route out of the shelter system. I think one of the reasons why I was looking for the quick route, is because, like most people, the word “shelter” to me kind of had a different meaning.  I never really looked at a shelter as a positive place, but that train of though was very quickly turned around. 

In the first couple of weeks at the house (notice how I like to refer to it as a house now rather than a shelter) I set up a meeting with the housing worker that the house has made available to us.  She sat down with me and started to explain my options (wow and when I tell you there is a lot of options I mean there were a lot of options I thought I was never gonna get outta that place) but during this conversation a program called Stay in School was brought up.  Now at the time I was kina like no I don’t think I wanna go back to school….I hated school.  But I look back at it now and thank goodness for proper guidance because if it wasn’t for all of the staff that I met with I wouldn’t of even thought of going back.  So I decided to look into going to school, and started the process for getting back into school and the Stay in School Program.  I enrolled at an Adult Education Centre and finished my high school diploma. 

During this time I was still struggling with drugs and alcohol, in the years leading up to my arrival at the house I had developed some habits that were taking control of my life and now were getting in the way of my schooling.  But thankfully with the support system and friendly faces at the house I was able to make the choices necessary to turn it all around.  Living in the Stay in School Program allowed me to utilize all of the tools needed for someone in my position to succeed.  Some of these things included the one on one counseling to talk about weekly, monthly and long term goals, and also any other problems that you may have that you feel like talking about, transit passes are available for transportation to and from school and other extra-curricular activities.  A full computer lab with printers, and computers with internet access for completing homework, also to help complete home work there are volunteer tutors that are available in the house in the evenings to help you one on one.

After completing my high school I decided that I wanted to go further with my education but I wasn’t really sure how to go about it, but once again there was YWS to help save my butt again.  Because YWS also had students from colleges and universities doing placements I was able to talk to them about the application process and also financial support program that would help pay for tuition and text books. Not too long after finishing adult school I enrolled at Humber College into a three year program for Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology it is a Robotics and Automation Profile Advanced Diploma.  This was one of the biggest steps I have ever taken in my life and I really couldn’t have done it without the help of the wonderful team of staff and volunteers at the house.  I have recently finished my third year and am now looking for that next big opportunity, a career.  My journey through YWS has definitely been a rocky path with lots of twists and turns but when it’s all said and done I am highly grateful that I have had the opportunity to meet all of the great people that are involved here with making this possible for me and many other youth in need.”

Shared by Matt, January 2007 at the opening of the YWS Stay in School Program and Renovated Emergency Residence.

YWS 30th anniversary series: Winona

YWS 30th anniversary series: Winona

Winona’s father punished her not only with words of anger but with angry fists.  Winona knew she had to leave home for her own survival.  She set aside money each week from her pay cheque but it was not enough to afford a place of her own.  The turning point was when Winona’s brother started to join her father in the physical assaults.  Winona arrived at Youth Without Shelter (YWS) feeling the whole world was against her.  Most of all Winona found it hard to believe that there were people who would want to help someone like her.

“I came to YWS as someone who was working but homeless. No one had any idea where I worked that I was homeless.  I arrived at work in professional clothes like everyone else.  I was very focused on getting a second job to save for first and last month rent.  Right away the morning routine at the shelter had a positive effect.  The 7 am wake-up got me to work on time! The Employment Facilitator really gave me confidence. Together we created the most professional resume.  Within weeks I landed that second job.

At YWS I did not feel disadvantaged, my morale was not broken, and I was never made to feel like I lived in a shelter.  The support prepared me to be on my own out there.  I even put on weight (loved the food).  YWS helped me focus and learn to listen.  What am I doing now?  Working with Laura, the Housing Coordinator I was able to move out to my own place.  I am sharing these words while back to visit the YWS Food Bank (really helps me stretch my monthly budget) and picking up an “On The Move Package” (wow:  sheets, towels, pots, even cleaning supplies to get me started).  My advice to youth in situations like mine:  be patient, stay focused on your goals, and don’t fight against those trying to help you.”

 Winona